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BILINGUAL EDUCATION

LAURENT CLERC

NATIONAL DEAF EDUCATION CENTER

Setting Language in Motion: Family Supports and Early Intervention for Babies Who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

VISUAL LANGUAGE AND

VISUAL LEARNING: 

VL2

The VL2 center publishes research briefs as a resource for educators and parents.

The Indiana School for the Deaf is the American SIgn Language and English bilingual educational environment where students belong, excel and thrive academically and socially. Below are resources with additional information on bilingual education.

RESEARCH BRIEFS

Science of Learning Center at Gallaudet University

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ASL CONNECT

Connect with your Deaf children through American Sign Language.

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Parent Advocacy App

An app for families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing attending IEP meetings, 504 meetings, or other meetings.

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National Deaf Center

Are you a parent or family member who wants to prepare your deaf individual for a bright future?

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CEASD

The Conference of Educational Administrators of Schools and Programs for the Deaf is an association of schools and educational programs involved with the education of deaf and hard of hearing individuals.

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American Society for Deaf Children

ASDC is committed to empowering diverse families with deaf children and youth by embracing full access to language-rich environments through mentoring, advocacy, resources, and collaborative networks.

Video above is the summary of the article below translated in ASL.

CHILDREN WITH HEARING LOSS

Children with hearing loss are consistently identified as being at-risk for deficits in executive functioning (EF). EF consists of cognitive skills including working memory, cognitive flexibility, attention, planning, problem solving, and inhibitory control. Research is often divided regarding whether difficulties with EF are a result of hearing loss itself or, rather, delays in language that are often related to hearing loss (i.e. inadequate exposure to language at a young age). Hall, Eigsti, Bortfeld, and Lillo-Martin (2018) investigated whether auditory access or language access was more crucial for the development of EF skills. The study utilized 3 groups: children with normal hearing, children who were “deaf native signers who had access to American Sign Language from birth”, and “oral cochlear implant users who did not have full access to language prior to implantation” (Hall et al., 2018). Results indicated that early access to language was more crucial than access to sound for development of strong EF skills. Hall et al. (2018) concluded that the results were consistent with the hypothesis that “language proficiency, whether in sign or speech, is crucial for the development of healthy EF” (Hall et al., 2018). This contributes to the existing research supporting the importance of early access to language (whether spoken or signed) for cognitive development.

 

Citation: Hall, M.L., Eigsti, I.M., Bortfeld, H., & Lillo-Martin, D. (2018). Executive function in Deaf children: Auditory access and language access. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 61(8), 1970-1988.

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