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@2018 by the Indiana School for the Deaf

ACADEMIC OVERVIEWS

** DUE TO COVID-19 - PLANS WILL SUBJECT TO CHANGE THAT MAY BE NECESSARY AS WARRANTED BY THE CORONAVIRUS SITUATION.**

Early Childhood Education (ECE) at Indiana School for the Deaf includes our Early Start Toddlers, Preschool and Pre-Kindergarten programs. These programs cater to children 18 months to 5 years of age. 

 

The Early Childhood Education (ECE) program offers a creative curriculum with a project approach. The ECE program is inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach. Children in the ECE program develop problem-solving and social skills as they discover their own interests in a self-guided and supportive environment.

 

The ECE program offers events for ECE students and their families outside of the school setting. These events are offered two Fridays out of the month and typically last for a duration of 1 to 2 hours. 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

HOME VISITS

The main focus of a home visit is to meet the need(s) of the child. The primary aim of each visit is to assist the child and his or her family with meeting milestones.

COMMUNITY OUTINGS

Community outings include playgroups and meet-ups for children in the ECE program and their families. These events are usually held in the afternoons and provide adults and children with the opportunity to meet in a public place outside of the school or home environment. These outings allow families to see how their young learner interacts with his or her peers. Community outings also allow parents and guardians to meet and interact as well.

IN-SCHOOL WORKSHOP

The in-school workshops address a number of topics that are requested by families of ECE students. Previous topics have included: Sign Language, Parent/Guardian Rights, IEP workshops, and transitioning. Child care is provided during each workshop.

EARLY START TODDLERS

Program Structure

The Early Start Toddler program is designed for children 18 months to 3 years of age.

 

This program is offered 2 days a week from 8:30am to 11:30am. Families may request a Monday/Wednesday or Tuesday/Thursday schedule.

Curriculum

The Early Start Toddler program focuses on language development and peer interaction. Children in the toddler program receive early exposure to language and strengthen their social skills through play-based activities.

 

In addition to language acquisition and peer development, the Early Start Toddler program also assists students with the development and expansion of fundamental academic skills, such as reading and writing. This program offers a research based, developmentally appropriate, reading and writing center to help young learners master basic skills. At the reading center students may use free time to look at books. During this time students learn foundational skills such as how to hold a book properly and in which direction to turn the book’s pages.  At the writing center students can engage in activities such as scribbling and “free” drawing.

PRESCHOOL

The Creative Curriculum and project approach are heavily intertwined in the ISD Pre-school program. Student engagement with a chosen topic of interest shapes teacher lesson plans. ECE preschool teachers guide each child as a resource and fellow learner.

 

Our Preschool program offers a rich bilingual environment for children to experience both English and American Sign Language. Each interaction throughout the day, whether it is in the classroom setting, lunch or recess, is viewed as an opportunity to build language and social skills.

PRE-KINDERGARTEN

Program Structure

The Pre-Kindergarten program is designed for children 4 to 5 years of age. This program is offered full-time during regular Willard school hours, Monday through Friday.

Curriculum

The Pre-Kindergarten program prepares young learners for the more structured kindergarten classroom setting.  Students in this program begin learning words and word formation for kindergarten readiness. These young learners also engage in play-based activities to encourage collaboration, problem solving and peer development.

ELEMENTARY

CURRICULUM

Elementary offers curricula under the Indiana Department of Education Proficiency Standards with emphasis on linguistic and cognitive skills with real world applications. Elementary at ISD comprises the Kindergarten through fifth grades. American Sign Language (ASL) is the language of instruction. The curricula encompass American Sign Language, language arts (ESL and literacy), mathematics, science, social studies, arts, physical education, computer lab, drama, communication, and social skills.

 

The major goal of the Elementary Program is to provide linguistic, social, and intellectual experiences to enable the students to develop literacy in two languages – ASL and English. Culturally, the students are offered experiences that will enhance the acquisition of the behaviors, attitudes, and values of both Deaf and Hearing communities. Caring adults who are licensed teachers provide these bilingual, bicultural experiences that support each child’s self-esteem and pride in family, community, ethnic, and linguistic heritage. We view ourselves as members of a world community with a variety of values and traditions. We feel that educational opportunities to learn about and value other cultures and traditions are important to the understanding and respecting of one’s own individual culture and traditions.

TYPE OF ASSESSMENTS

Indiana Standards and Tools for Alternate Reporting (ISTAR)

ISTAR measures student progress in English/Language Arts (ELA), Science (Grades 4, 6, and 10), Math (Grades 3-8, and 10), and Social Studies (Grades 5 and &) based on alternate standards. Grade-level standardized tests may not be able to adequately assess students who perform at a rate significantly below their grade level. ISTAR aims to alleviate this issue.

 

World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA)

WIDA is an English language proficiency assessment put in place to meet Indiana’s standards for college and career-readiness. This assessment measures English language skills.

 

NWEA- Measure of Progress (MAP)

Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) are for students in grades K-12. These assessments have been designed to measure academic growth, establish curriculum, predict proficiency on tests, etc.

 

IREAD-3

This assessment measures basic reading skills up to the 3rd grade. This test is designed to ensure that all students can read at acceptable levels before advancing to the 4th grade. 

GRADING SCALE

K-2 GRADE

O = EXCELLENT PROGRESS

S = SATISFACTORY PROGRESS

N = NEEDS IMPROVEMENT

3-5 GRADE

A = EXCELLENT

B = GOOD

C = AVERAGE

D = POOR

F = FAILING

MIDDLE SCHOOL

CURRICULUM

The Middle School offer curricula under the Indiana Department of Education Proficiency Standards with emphasis on linguistic and cognitive skills with real-world applications.

The Middle School comprises the sixth through the eighth grades. The curricula encompasses Language Arts (English & Reading), Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, ASL and Deaf Studies, Physical Education and Health, as well as quarterly class rotations. It utilizes technology, especially computers, as productivity tools. There are seven class periods per day.

Mission

The mission of the ISD Middle School department is to provide an educational, bilingual environment in which students feel safe, secure and unlimited in pursuing learning experiences to their maximum potential. ISD is committed to providing students with the encouragement and educational opportunities necessary to prepare them to become productive members of society. It is the ISD's goal is to assure that all students receive a well-rounded education that emphasizes high academic and social standards, promote healthy lifestyles, cultivate critical thinking and problem solving skills, develop technological literacy, provide for postsecondary and/or career preparation, and instill a desire for life-long learning.

 

Vision

ISD Middle School department is fully committed to providing each student with a well-rounded educational program in a bilingual environment leading to high school which will foster independence and social responsibility in the 21st century.

TYPE OF ASSESSMENTS

Indiana Standards and Tools for Alternate Reporting (ISTAR)

ISTAR measures student progress in English/Language Arts (ELA), Science (Grades 4, 6, and 10), Math (Grades 3-8, and 10), and Social Studies (Grades 5 and &) based on alternate standards. Grade-level standardized tests may not be able to adequately assess students who perform at a rate significantly below their grade level. ISTAR aims to alleviate this issue.

 

World-Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA)

WIDA is an English language proficiency assessment put in place to meet Indiana’s standards for college and career-readiness. This assessment measures English language skills.

 

NWEA- Measure of Progress (MAP)

Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) are for students in grades K-12. These assessments have been designed to measure academic growth, establish curriculum, predict proficiency on tests, etc.

 

ISTEP+ Grades 3-8

The ISTEP+ is designed to test students in the areas of English/Language Arts, Math, Science (Grades 4 and 6), and Social Studies (Grades 5 and 7).  

GRADING SCALE

All students will be marked according to their achievement within the level  in which they are working. In general, courses will be graded four times a year. View grading scale.

HIGH SCHOOL
COLLEGE & CAREER

GRADING POLICY

Incomplete Grades


An Incomplete (I) is given when a student does not complete the requirements of the course. The student must plan with the teacher to meet those requirements. Teachers must submit final grades for each student upon completion of the course or inform the principal what arrangements have been made to remove the incomplete. Accommodations for individual situations can be made by the principal if necessary. Each student has two weeks, 10 school days, after the last day of the grading period to fulfill the requirements of the course upon returning from an extended absence (three days or more). Any work not made up will be recorded as failing. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the principal.

 

Formula for Calculating GPA of Weighted Courses


Advanced Placement (AP) classes will receive weighted grades. All AP classes will carry a weight of 1.5, unless otherwise noted, which will be multiplied by the number of semester AP courses passed divided by the number of semesters of high school completed. This quotient will be added to the GPA.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The completion of Core 40 is an Indiana graduation requirement. Indiana’s Core 40 curriculum provides the academic foundation all students need to succeed in college and the workforce. To graduate with less than Core 40, the following formal opt-out process must be completed: The student, the student’s parent/guardian, and the student’s counselor (or another staff member who assists students in course selection) must meet to discuss the student’s progress. The student’s Graduation Plan (including four year course plan) is reviewed. The student’s parent/guardian determines whether the student will achieve greater educational benefits by completing the general curriculum or the Core 40 curriculum. If the decision is made to opt-out of Core 40, the student is required to complete the course and credit requirements for a general diploma and the career/academic sequence the student will pursue is determined.

PROGRAM STUDIES

Indiana School for the Deaf offers four kinds of diplomas:

Core 40, General Diploma, Core 40 with Academic Honors and Certificate.

 

A decision on a specific track is determined by a team of case conference, thus early planning is critical in assisting students achieve their goals and demonstrate readiness for post-graduation plans.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP)

The Indiana School for the Deaf offers Advanced Placement (AP) courses for high school students. The College Board sponsors The Advanced Placement Program. The Advanced Placement Program (AP) gives students the opportunity to take college-level courses and exams while they are still in high school. Students may earn college credit, accelerated placement, or both for college. Students showing an interest to take an AP course must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or with the Director of Instruction’s permission.


Grade weights for all College Board Advanced Placement courses will be removed if students do not complete the scheduled AP examination for any reason. Cumulative class ranks and cumulative GPA’s will be retroactively recalculated for students who do not complete the scheduled AP examination in order to remove any grade weight advantage the student may have received for the course.


A new law, PL 91, requires all Indiana public colleges and universities including all two and four year institutions to award college credits for Indiana secondary school students that earn a score of 3 or higher on College Board’s Advanced Placement (AP).


Indiana public colleges and universities may require a score higher than 3 to award credits (score from 1 to 5) for a course that is required for a student’s major. If a college or university chooses to do so, it must still award a student elective credits that count toward his/her overall degree requirements to graduate from college.


Students enrolled in for AP courses are required to take the Advanced Placement exams in May.


The Indiana Department of Education pays for science and math exams for juniors and seniors, so there is no cost to ISD juniors and seniors for these tests. All other tests have fees. Currently we offer two AP courses; English Literature and Composition, AP and European History, AP. For a complete course description and other information regarding AP courses go to: https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses​.

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION (CTE)

The Career and Technical Education (CTE) Department at the Indiana School for the Deaf is a highly developed, work-based training program for both High School and Transitional students. Sophisticated equipment and industry-standard software training allow our students to learn with hands-on training that give them marketable job-skills.

To prepare for success, students must have opportunities to reinforce, apply and transfer their work experience knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. Knowledge about career opportunities, requirements, and expectations and the development of workplace skills prepare students for success in the work force, training or college.

TRANSITION AND CAREER SERVICES (TACS)

Transition Services are a planned set of activities that assist students with moving from school to post-school activities. In the Transition and Career Services (TACS) program these services include community experiences, instruction, the development of employment, and other post-school adult living tasks and goals. The TACS staff takes each student's abilities and interests to heart in trying to match students with jobs that will not only interest them, but will also offer enough variety so that students have a clearer understanding of their own individual strengths in order to best plan for their futures. 

J. EVERETT LIGHT CENTER (JEL)

The Indiana School for the Deaf has been working in conjunction with Washington Township Schools’ J. Everett Light Career Center to provide intensive vocational training to students who identify that they would like to leave high school with national board certification in their chosen vocational field. The J. Everett Light program lasts for two years. Some programs have specific prerequisites for enrollment. See your Guidance Counselor for specific grade level requirements.

 

JEL Career Center classes relate academic subjects to the “real world of work”. Students learn in a classroom specifically designed to resemble the related work atmosphere. The Career Center uses state-of-the-art equipment, computer programs and teaching techniques to give students the “hands on” experiences that students usually don’t experience until they enroll in post-secondary institutions.

 

Students can earn elective high school credits for JELCC courses. Upon passing a course for the semester, a student can earn three credits for a three-hour course and two credits for a two-hour course. ISD will add these credits to the transcript. Additional information may be found on their website at www.jelcc.com

ORIOLE ACADEMY

The Transition and Career Services program (TACS) established the Oriole Academy to assist students with work readiness skills. The Oriole Academy follows the Indiana State Department of Education's curriculum for Interdisciplinary Cooperative Education (ICE), in which part of the school day is set aside for work experience, while another works on academic skills that support the student in career education in general and toward his or her specific job placement.

O'KEEFE SCHOLARSHIP

The Dona O’Keefe Tucholski Scholarship fund (funded by the private foundation founded in 1996 by Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. O’Keefe) will be given to the top graduating student from ISD in the amount of $500.00. Qualifications for this scholarship: the student must be Deaf+ and attend a local technical college.

RECIPIENTS OF THE O'KEEFE SCHOLARSHIP

2011 – Jorge Aleman

2012 – Stephanie Zachary

2013 – Aries Locke

2014 – Aviv Levy

2015 – Aubrey Gibson

2016 – Andrew Todd

2017 – Kietel-Layton Certeza

2018 – Julissa Howle

2019 – Michael Lantz

2020 - Audrey Haynes

CURRICULUM

Our High School comprises the ninth through the twelfth grades. The curricula encompass English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Career and Technical Education, and School to Work opportunities. At Indiana School for the Deaf (ISD) high school students participate in the development of their transition plan to be better prepared for their future endeavors.

 

Mission

The mission of the ISD High School department is to provide an educational, bilingual environment in which students feel safe, secure and unlimited in pursuing learning experiences to their maximum potential. ISD is committed to providing students with the encouragement and educational opportunities necessary to prepare them to become productive members of society. It is the ISD's goal is to assure that all students receive a well-rounded education that emphasizes high academic and social standards, promote healthy lifestyles, cultivate critical thinking and problem solving skills, develop technological literacy, provide for postsecondary and/or career preparation, and instill a desire for life-long learning.

 

Vision

ISD High School department is fully committed to providing each student with a well-rounded educational program in a bilingual environment leading to college entrance and/or career paths which will foster economic independence and social responsibility in the 21st century.